The Heart of Worship

So many churches are looking for the “key” to a more vibrant worship service.  What will get people singing and participating more effectively?  They look for the solution in the choice of songs, or style of music, or the personality of the music leadership — but none of these things is really the answer to the problem, according to scripture.  Psalm 28 shows us what is at the heart of effective worship:

Verse 7 says:  “The Lord is my strength and my shield; my heart trusts in Him, and I am helped; therefore my heart exults, and with my song I shall thank Him.”

 David says of God: “My heart trusts in Him”.  The basis of his worship was in a heart that trusted in God.  This is where our relationship with God — and our worship — must begin.  Where there is no genuine faith relationship with God, there can be no true worship.

The verse continues by saying that because his heart trusts in God, “I am helped.”  God promises to help the one who truly turns to Him in heartfelt faith.  As a result of the help he receives from God, he then rejoices: “Therefore my heart exults.”  David then expresses that heart-felt joy with a worship song: “And with my song I shall thank Him.”  Worship singing for David was not just a “routine” — it was the opportunity for him to show God how grateful he was for what He had done for him. 

Thus we see from David in Psalm 28 what is at “the heart of worship” that is effective: it is not found in any particular style of worship, in greater quality music, or charismatic leadership.  Our singing will be what it should when the people singing have a real commitment to God, when they realize how much they have been helped by Him, and look forward to expressing their gratitude to Him with heartfelt singing.

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About Shawn Thomas

My blog, shawnethomas.com, provides brief daily devotions from own personal Bible reading, as well as some of my sermons, book reviews, and family life experiences.
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